Art of recycling…

Here is something I found again on design-dautore.com and it shows how one man’s trash can be another mans treasure….Art can save the earth, literally…simply making art out of recycled things=)

Much more of this you can find by pressing here.

I share only few artists this time, out of the many fantastic once… so stay tuned for more next time and I hope you’ll enjoy=)

Zac Freeman

“I started making assemblage artworks of this type in 1999. The artworks are made entirely out of collected junk, found objects, and general trash. I glue the bits of junk to a wooden substrate to form an image, usually faces, which only can be seen at a distance. I was interested in communicating through visual representation in apparent 2-dimensional space and through the actual objects used for the medium in 3-dimensional space. It is very important to me that I incorporate the actual objects into the art as opposed to a picture or rendition of it because it better expresses the intention of the artwork. I feel the junk is more powerful being present. It is an actual thing to be reckoned with that existed in this time and place and carries energy in and of itself.” 

 

Jennifer Maestre

(born 1959 in Johannesburg, South Africa) is a Massachusetts-based artist, internationally known for her unique pencil sculptures.
“To make the pencil sculptures, I take hundreds of pencils, cut them into 1-inch sections, drill a hole in each section (to turn them into beads), sharpen them all and sew them together. The beading technique I rely on most is peyote stitch. I’m inspired by animals, plants, other art, Ernst Haeckel, Odilon Redon, mythology. In fact, it isn’t easy to specify particular sources of inspiration. Sometimes one sculpture will inspire the next, or maybe I’ll make a mistake, and that will send me off in a new direction…”

 

Robert Bradford 

Robert Bradford creates his life-size and larger-than-life sculptures of humans and animals from discarded plastic items, mainly toys but also other colorful plastic bits and pieces, such as combs and buttons, brushes and parts of clothes pegs. Contrary to some reports, he’s not a self-taught artist who tinkered in his shed one day and suddenly decided to create something out of his kids’ discarded toys. He is a London-born and U.K. and U.S.-trained visual artist who, like many artists, also had another career on the side. His was that of a psychotherapist. In 2002, he started to consider the possibilities that his children’s forgotten toys could have as part of something bigger. Bradford says he likes the idea that the plastic pieces have a history, some unknown past, and that they also pass on a “cultural” history as each of the pieces represents a point in time.

 

Erika Iris Simmons (one of MY very favorite styles of art…)

“I like to take things- random things- like what you would find at a garage sale or in a thrift store- and make them into composite art. Most of my pieces become portraits of people associated with the item I’ve chosen. I don’t really add any paint or pigments… I usually just take things apart and re-arrange them in weird ways, cutting away pieces when necessary. A lot of my art is made with cassette tapes and old film reels in a series I call “Ghost in the Machine.”.

 

Anton Tang

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The most adorable part of recycling art post, you might even seen it before but just didn’t know who it’s made by…Well, it’s Anton Tang=)

For being a cardboard cut-outs, these tiny pieces of art live large. Singapore-based artist showcases his adorable work through everyday life situations with a dash of light-hearted comedy…and sometimes sensitivity! “There are times when many of us would like to cover our heads with a cardboard box and shield ourselves from the outside world”, Tang mentions. We are only human and do have those days, indeed.

Sincerely,

S.
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